Print On-Demand: How it works

The first thing you need to do when you finish your book and consider getting it published through print on demand is... can you guess? Find an editor and a copy editor. Then after you’re absolutely positively sure you’ve got something ready for the world to see there are a variety of options... well at first glance at least

A cursory look at the well known print on demand services can reveal shocking results: most of them charge! Not only is that ridiculous, but so is the average price. Frankly paying to publish your book is insane when a better option exists. I explain amazon’s Createspace in another article and frankly it’s the best option for a typical book.

The basic concept is the same whether you fork out a chunk of cash or not. You hone and perfect your work, fiddle around with formatting and templates. (Or pay someone else to) and voila you have a book only your nearest and dearest have ever heard of.

Then you either work your buns off trying to get noticed or you hire someone to do the marketing for you. There are some resources to do this and I will be providing some links at a later date.

The true advantage of Publish on Demand is creative control. You can work with the editor of your choosing, you can decide what the book looks like, you can write the back blurb in fact with the advent of POD a book can truly once again become a work of art in itself, not just the words on the page.

Grumbles and complaints are made about badly written books flooding the market. But as I’ve already covered. It’s nothing new. What POD offers is the opportunity to become an independent artist and sometimes create something of greater quality, depending on the equivalent publishing house.

So long as he knows what he is doing, when to get help, and doesn’t publish too early, a writer in total control can craft a book to be proud of, particularly if he goes full DYI (Or as much as possible) There are pitfalls however. And without being willing to put in a lot of work and some decent connections. It’s expensive, even if you technically aren’t required to spend a dime.

If you want your work to be good, and who doesn’t? You have to handle all the details a publishing house would handle for you. This can be great. This can be tiresome as all hell. It’s definitely something to research thoroughly before you decide.

I’d like to quote Jamie Hyneman now. Because I can and it fits. “Think then act, don’t act then think.” as you go through this whole subsection one option may leap out or at least seem slightly better than the other. But it’s not a decision to be taken lightly or made out of exhaustion.
Just because you’re sick of rejection letters doesn’t mean print on demand is for you. It might not offer what you want and you might be able to get an agent with a more polished manuscript or a better query letter.

Why wouldn’t you want to go independent? Read the “Reality Check”. Print on demand has an ugly side to it too.

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